In partnership with the
 Indie
Cork Festival of Independent Film & Music

14th October 2018

(3pm and 5pm @ Blacknight Festival Centre, Dali)

 
6th Ó Bhéal Poetry-Film Competition

The competition shortlist of 31 films will be screened in two parts, at the Blacknight Festival Centre, in Dali, Carey’s Lane, Cork city.

The films were chosen from 193 submissions from 33 countries on 6 continents, all completed within two years of the submission opening date. The shortlist represents seventeen countries: Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, England, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Ireland, Latvia, Romania, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan & the USA.

Our 2018 judges, poet Anamaría Crowe Serrano and filmmaker Oonagh Kearney, will select one winner to receive the IndieCork award for best poetry film.


 

Tickets to each screening are €6.00


 




Competition Shortlist – Screening A (48:47)

Sunday 15th October @ 3.00pm

Dali, Carey’s Lane, Cork




Tsukumogami (2:14)

Poem: Tsukumogami

by Cindy St. Onge

Synopsis – Tsukumogami are objects that, in Japanese lore, may acquire a soul after 100 years. These objects are often tools and useful items, but could be anything.
Relics and items approaching their century of use are sometimes destroyed, to prevent the object from becoming haunted. This is the second video in the Red Storm series. It is filmed with an iPhone, initial editing done with iMovie, soundtrack composed with Garage Band iPhone app, and final editing done with Movie Maker and Movavi.

Director: Cindy St. Onge (USA)

Cindy St. Onge is a multi-media poet whose video poems have been screened in video festivals in the US and Europe, and have been showcased at Moving Poems, Poetry Seen, Writing without Paper, and Poetry Film Live. In addition to her own Fever Dream Remix productions, she has collaborated with other filmmakers, contributing poetry and voice work. She resides in Oregon, USA.



Disillusionment of 10 Point Font (1:12)

Poem: Disillusionment of 10 Point Font

by Greg Condon

Synopsis – Words move to express their meaning.

Director: Greg Condon (USA)

Greg Condon is a filmmaker based in Brooklyn NY.

For more about Greg visit www.hiddenjunk.net



Can I Stay Here With You? (4:07)

Poem: Can I Stay Here With You?

by Dan Sociu

Synopsis – I am the present.

Director: Adrian Campean
(Germany/Romania)

Adrian studied Cinematography at the film school in Munich and works since then in international projects. His second passion is photography. He searches for an abstract truth on the streets. His interest now shifts more and more towards surrealism.



A Cat In An Empty Apartment (2:00)

Poem: Cat in an Empty Apartment

by Wislawa Szymborska

Synopsis – A cat is left in an empty apartment. Time is passing. Something is still while something is moving.

Director: Liang-Hsin Huang (Taiwan)

Liang-Hsin Huang was born in Taiwan and is now studying experimental animation at the Royal College of Art in London. She is specialized in hand-drawn and stop-motion animation.



Work (2:25)

Poem: Work

by Anna Woodford

Synopsis – ‘Work’ is both a hand-drawn animation and a photographic study. It was put together in a dark archive store room. The spot-lit yellow post-it notes frame a poet reminiscing about an old office job she once had before becoming a writer. Mirroring the function of a post-it note stuck to a document, the post-it note animation demarcates, highlights and obscures glimpses of shelves, desks and objects synonymous with any office.

The objects in those glimpses are those used to categorise, label, post, file and eventually build a physical archive and yet they, and the people who use them, are often invisible when considering the cultural significances of archives and how they are used to articulate cultural history. They are all a part of and apart from an archive.
The film with its claustrophobic ‘muzak’ soundtrack – reminiscent of being placed ‘on hold’, creates an uneasy juxtaposition between art and administration. It flirts with the answer to the question, ‘How can we attest to work that holds low or no social and cultural value?’
‘Work’ seeks to explore the ways memory can fragment, disrupt and overlay the present and creates a space for the haunting poem by Anna Woodford to unfold.

Director: Kate Sweeney (England)

Kate Sweeney is an artist producing work that incorporates documentary, photography, drawing, video and animation. She is interested in video-making as collage and a tool for transformation and translation of materials and stories. Her video pieces have exhibited internationally including Sydney International Film Festival, Zebra FilmFestival in Berlin, Manchester Animation Festival, International Poetry Festival in London. Her films ‘Hammersmith’ and ‘Vaccine’ were awarded Best International Poetry Film at Festival Silencio in Lisbon 2016 and 2017 respectively. Kate has taught Fine Art, Animation and lectured in poetry-film. She is currently undertaking a funded, practice-led PhD at Newcastle University.



Accident de Personne (3:35)

Poem: Accident de Personne

by Álvaro Martín

Synopsis – We create metaphors in order to mention facts we don’t want to talk about.

Director: Álvaro Martín (Spain/France)

Born in Valladolid, Spain, with a degree in Philosophy by the University of Salamanca, Álvaro Martín is interested in all kinds of art, especially in cinema and literature. In 2011 he created the movie production company Dream Zero Films (www.dreamzerofilms.com), he has directed several film shorts under that brand, like The Adorable Tenant (2013), Stockholm (2013), Disintegration (2014) or Cinema Roxy (2014).


 



Portrait of C (4:40)

Poem: Portrait of C

by Richard Harvor

Synopsis – This is based on a piece of writing by my brother, Richard. I found it in his papers after he died.

He died of alcoholism, but struggled to control his drinking for several years – while witnessing some of his friends self-destruct before him. This poem describes his relationship with C. – the sort of effortlessly handsome lad that young people tend to instinctively envy. But C.’s family background is marked with a sort of mouldering doom. He descends into junkiedom, while my brother, attempting to stifle his desire to drink, munches on hard, sweet chunks of ice cream.

Director: Finn Harvor (South Korea)

Finn Harvor is an artist, writer, filmmaker, and musician who lives in South Korea. He has published poetry and prose in a wide variety of literary journals, and his visual work (both drawings and videos) has been shown in Canada, the US, UK, Greece, Kazakhstan, Korea, and Cuba.



Silly (1:59)

Poem: Silly

by Hanna Ojala

Synopsis – This piece is a description of a bittersweet moment of nostalgia.

Director: Hanna Ojala (Finland)

Hanna Ojala, 34, is a self-made poet and filmmaker as well as a dance movement therapist from Finland, who has finally found her way of creative expression through video poetry and is keenly learning more every day. She savors verbalizing actual events in an abstract way as well as describing the visceral effects of inner emotions – making the invisible visible and the visible vague. She creates all her work on her iPhone 6s including the visuals and the soundscapes, the finishing touches she makes on iSkysoft Video Editor.



Mon Pays (3:35)

Poem: Mon Pays

by Ousmane Moussa Diagana

Synopsis – The poet muses about the beauty and complexity of his country, Mauritania. The film is animated, with paint on paper, as a surreal free association painting inspired by the poem.

Director: Diek Grobler (South Africa)

Diek Grobler’s art practice covers a variety of media and disciplines. He is an exhibiting fine artist, has illustrated children’s books, and directed and produced short animated films. He has received 4 international awards, and his films have been included in more than 40 international festivals. “So much depends upon a stick in the mud” – Animation installation, Venice Biennale, 2015; “Filmverse” – creative director(2014 & 2016); Het Vogeltjes ABC – 2008: winner Best film for children Teheran IAF, KROK , and Tindirindis.



City Swans (3:22)

Poem: City Swans

by Bernard O’Rourke

Synopsis – This film is an adaptation of my own poem, which considers the swans who’ve made their home in Dublin’s grand canal as something timeless and separate from the urban environment that surrounds them. The film contrasts the images of nature with that of human development, and by doing so, searches for a kind of rough beauty in this intersection.

Director: Bernard O’Rourke (Ireland)

Bernard O’Rourke is a writer and filmmaker. His writing has appeared in Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine, The Tangerine, Queen Mob’s Teahouse, The Honest Ulsterman, The Bohemyth and Wordlegs. As a spoken word artist, he has performed at Arcadian Fields, Lingo Festival, NYF Dublin, Just Words, The Monday Echo, Flying South, and more. In 2017, his short film Impression, Canal was shortlisted for the Ó Bhéal Poetry Film Prize at the IndieCork Film Festival. He lives in Dublin.



Mira (2:39)

Poem: Mira

by Najaat Hussein

Synopsis – A girl is forced out of her dreams due to a superior command.

 
Director: Najaat Hussein (Ghana)

Najaat Hussein Suhuyini is a nineteen year old poet, actress, filmmaker and Beauty Queen, she is the winner of Face of NAFTI 2018 beauty pageant/Film contest. She blends poetry and film-making to send messages of liberation across to her audience. She is a first year student of National Film and Television Institute (NAFTI) in Ghana.



Dear God (4:00)

Poem: A Refugee-Child’s Still Prayer

by Isa Aouifia

Synopsis – A refugee-child’s still prayer.

Director: Sosi Chamoun (Sweden)

Sosi Chamoun, born 1989, has been working in filmmaking and teaching since 2014. Her previous film ”Prinsesspojken” (2016) has been screened at multiple international film festivals and it was awarded a Jury award at Ann Arbor Film Festival and the Best LGBT Short Award at Cleveland International Film Festival in 2017.



Coyote Wedding (1:57)

Poem: Coyote Wedding

by Brittani Sonnenberg

Synopsis – Why are free sample stations in fancy grocery stores so terrifying? How do we articulate desire? And W.W.A.C.D? (What would a coyote do?)

Director: Jane Glennie (UK)

Born in Rustington, West Sussex (UK). Trained as a typographer by the University of Reading. Jane Glennie practiced for many years as a jobbing freelance designer. Moving towards contemporary art, she took her Masters degree in Art & Space (Distinction) at Kingston University, London. Her work about ambivalent motherhood has been exhibited by ProCreate Project in London in 2017 and in M.A.M.A. issue #23. Her film work has been shown at Digital Graffiti festival in Florida (USA); by PoetryFilm at the Hackney Picturehouse (UK) and Reykjavik (Iceland); in Art Language Location in Cambridge (UK); on Visual Container TV as part of the 29th Festival Les Instants Vidéo (France); and by Visible Poetry Project at the New York Poetry Festival (USA). This year her work was awarded a Jury Special Mention at the 3rd Weimar Poetry Film Festival (Germany) and 4th Place at the Poole Poetry Film Competition.



Considering the Snail (2:27)

Poem: Considering the Snail

by Thom Gunn

Synopsis – a poem about perseverance.

Director: Lucia Sellars (UK)

Lucia Sellars is a poet, an environmental scientist and a quiet observer. She published a pamphlet at 18, after winning the Premio Joven Contest in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. She has also published in magazines such as The Response (Fabrica Art Gallery – Brighton), Cronopis (Barcelona), Alba (London), Datableed (online zine), and Tears on the Fence. She started to perform in Oxford in 2014 at The Catweazle, and was part of Poetry Can F*Off, by Heathcote Williams in 2015. Her video-poems have been projected at the Athens International Video Poetry Festival 2016 in Greece, Film Poem Festival 2017 in Lewes, UK and the 2018 Film and Video Poetry Symposium in L.A., USA. Her recent published piece is The Quiet Life of Walls.



Going to the Well (2:16)

Poem: Going to the Well

by Lani O’Hanlon

Synopsis – In many parts of the world the water rights of native peoples are being forcefully acquired by multinationals. This film mixes poetry and poetic imagery to explore the issue of clean water becoming a commodity.

Director: Fiona Aryan (Ireland)

Fiona Aryan is a painter, graphic artist, illustrator, film maker and mother. She has shown her work in solo and group exhibitions in Ireland. She is interested in the interaction of the natural world with the world of people, and the interaction of the world of dreams with conscious reality. She lives in county Wicklow.



Another April (5:39)

Poem: Another April

by Julia Giles

Synopsis – The narrator of this filmpoem takes the viewer on a walk around the fields where she grew up and decides to return a small field named The Demmon. On the way to The Demmon birdsong can be heard, alternating with the sound of a tractor working somewhere in the distance. For the narrator, the process of re-connecting with timeless features of the landscape, such as the lark’s song, and the textures of the land on a spring day also brings a recollection and re-connection with her father – the ploughman. It’s his tractor that can be heard during the walk.

Director: Julia Giles (UK)

Julia Giles is a visual artist. She grew up on a farm in Cornwall. Working alongside her father and grandfather from childhood into her twenties, she learned early that however carefully they planned, their success depended to a significant extent on the vagaries of the weather. This relationship with the land and a wary respect for the unpredictable power of the elements has never left her and is at the heart of her work as an artist. Since her initial training as a painter, she has extended her practice to include photography, performance, land-works and installation. In recent years she has begun to think about the emotional and psychological aspect of people’s relationship with their environment and the impact of their powerlessness in the face of natural forces. Film making and poetic narrative writing is a new direction for Julia.




Competition Shortlist – Screening B (49:40)

Sunday 14th October @ 5.00pm

Dali, Carey’s Lane, Cork




Stone (1:51)

Poem: Stone

by Denise Ryan

Synopsis – It centres around a girl who arises from the ashes and builds a boat from her own charred bones. All the while her spirit guide who is in the form of a dog follows her where ever she goes. She and her loyal basset hound sail the iced waters to live on a rock for all eternity, leaving her past behind.

Director: Peter Delaney (Ireland) and Animator: Adriana Kyulevchelieva (Bulgaria)

Peter Delaney is a creative director at One Productions.

Adriana Kyulevchelieva is a storyboard artist, animator, illustrator, painter and script supervisor. “I am an artist who finds inspiration in dreams, nature, other people (real or imaginary). I like the weird and unusual and most of all I enjoy drawing by hand. I’m also an animator, a freelance storyboard artist and illustrator with a special love for music videos.” There’s more about Adriana’s work at www.behance.net/Trashka



Mare Frigoris (4:42)

Poem: Mare Frigoris

by Mary Kathryn Jablonski

Synopsis – Mare Frigoris, “In the Bleak Midwinter,” is a traditional winter song based on a poem by Christina Rossetti, reinterpreted & sung by Mary Kathryn Jablonski.

Director: Laura Frare (USA)

Laura Frare is an adjunct art professor, experimental filmmaker, and a self taught multi-instrumentalist, playing a variety of electronic and digital instruments, making audio field
recordings, loops, and samples. Employing the “exquisite corpse” method, much like a collagist, she loves participating in collaborative projects with other artists. For more about Laura visit: vimeo.com/laurafrare



The Entropy of Forgiveness (4:07)

Poem: Entropy of Forgiveness

by Angelica Poversky

Synopsis – The Entropy of Forgiveness is a collaborative spoken word film that follows the words of Angelica Poversky who explores welcoming grief and guilt into life, to have it hold less heaviness. The music, words and film are all original.

Director: Merissa Victor (Canada)

Merissa Victor is a filmmaker residing in Vancouver BC, studying Media Studies at UBC. Merissa is from Malaysia and since coming to Canada has been exploring a feminist gaze in her media production, in her two previous films In the Pink and At First Sight, in both of which she worked alongside Poversky to produce.



Hinaus in die Nacht (2:04)

Poem: Hinaus in die Nacht

by Peter Thiers

Synopsis – A brief look between the mists of future and past.

Director: Livius Pápay (Germany)

Former Farmer, Kindergarten Teacher, Tourist Guide and Electrician, Livius Pápay is currently creating Graphics and Film. For more about Livius’s work, visit www.liviuspapay.com



Light Ghazal (2:16)

Poem: Light Ghazal

by Matt Hetherington

Synopsis – A meditation on dark and light.

Director: Marie Craven (Australia)

Marie Craven assembles videos from poetry, music, voice, still and moving images, by various artists around the world. Often created via the internet, the pieces are collaborative in essence. Since 2014, Marie has put together over 60 video poems. Prior to this she collaborated extensively as a vocalist for electronic musicians, also via the internet. She sometimes voices her poetry videos too. During the 1990s and early 2000s she wrote and directed short narrative and experimental films that were screened and awarded widely at international film festivals. Her earliest involvement in media was in the mid-1980s with super 8 film-making. Her Dictionary Illustrations, from a poem by Sarah Sloat, won the 2016 Ó Bhéal Poetry Film Competition. To see more of Marie’s work, visit vimeo.com/mariecraven



The Whole Speaks (2:15)

Poem: The Whole Speaks

Nelms Creekmur

Synopsis – Blacksmith Nelms Creekmur shows and tells us about the creative process. Nelms Creekmur is a writer and blacksmith who lives and works in Atlanta, Georgia. He spends his days making art out of found railroad ties, crafting them into useful and ruggedly beautiful items. When he is not pounding metal on an anvil, he can be found pounding the keys of an old school typewriter, telling tales of what it is like to create something out of nothing.

Director: Caroline Rumley (USA)

Caroline Rumley is a multi-modal storyteller working with video, pictures, found footage, spoken word, text, and sound. She is interested in the visual narrative in its many forms, particularly in what Malcolm Gladwell calls a “thin-sliced instance,” that brief flash that tells you all you need to know. Her experimental documentaries and poetry films have screened in the US and Europe, most recently at the Atlanta Film Festival and the Houston Center for Photography. A video-based body of her work is included in the British Journal of Photography on Charlotte Cotton’s “Best of 2017” list. She works in Atlanta, where she lives with her family.



The White Flower (3:05)

Poem: (A Laika)

by Unknown

Synopsis – Dainas are small lyric poems coming from the oral tradition that constitute one of the most important and ancient treasures of Latvia. In 2001, dainas were declared as an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO. “Balta puķe” (“The white flower”) is a dialogue between some of these dainas and images recorded in Latvia in the winter of 2015. This dialogue revolves around the concept of “memento mori” which reminds us of the inexorability of Death. Latvian language along with Lithuanian, are considered the most archaic Indo-European languages of those which are spoken today.

Director: Hernán Talavera (Latvia)

Hernán Talavera makes his films in the same intimate and lonely way he works on his paintings. After taking his degree in Fine Arts, he expanded his studies through workshops held by international renowned artists and filmmakers, including Abbas Kiarostami, Bill Viola, Toni Conrad, Víctor Erice, José Luis Guerin and Antonio López. Talavera has directed the film Song in the night (2016) and the short films Four postcards to Marta (2015), Interiorism (2009) and In memoriam (2005) which have been awarded and screened at festivals in countries including Australia, EEUU, Canada, Germany, Iran, Colombia, France, UK, Greece, Russia, Poland, Italy, Serbia, Portugal, Spain, Mexico, Albania, India, Chile …



The Violence of Sadness II (4:28)

Poem: The Violence of Sadness II

by Finn Harvor

Synopsis – The main story of the movie–which are part of a much longer, book-length series of connected poetry movies, which also includes songs, artwork, and audio projects – is that of the death of my brother. He was an alcoholic. He was also probably self-medicating underlying conditions–depression certainly one of them. But his decline and dysfunctional decision-making was also linked to dysfunction within the family. That’s how it often is with addicts: the problems exist on individual levels; they also exist on group levels.

Director: Finn Harvor (South Korea)

Finn Harvor is an artist, writer, filmmaker, and musician who lives in South Korea. He has published poetry and prose in a wide variety of literary journals, and his visual work (both drawings and videos) has been shown in Canada, the US, UK, Greece, Kazakhstan, Korea, and Cuba.



Fever (1:41)

Poem: Fever

by Hanna Ojala

Synopsis – An outcry for the passion of life one feels on the inside but finds hard to show on the outside – the burning urge of wanting to be seen and heard as a unique channel of love and creativity.

Director: Hanna Ojala (Finland)

Hanna Ojala, 34, is a self-made poet and filmmaker as well as a dance movement therapist from Finland, who has finally found her way of creative expression through video poetry and is keenly learning more every day. She savors verbalizing actual events in an abstract way as well as describing the visceral effects of inner emotions – making the invisible visible and the visible vague. She creates all her work on her iPhone 6s including the visuals and the soundscapes, the finishing touches she makes on iSkysoft Video Editor.



Being and being empty (0:48)

Poem: Being and being empty

by Jane Glennie

Synopsis – How to be a mother … who is this being that I am? Wanting to be half-full with the joy of play, a job well done, and the softness of a bed to sink into at the end. Feeling half-empty with a busy brain that won’t shut down and twitches into awakening too early. Feeling overwhelmed by the chores and feeling rubbish as a result because surely that’s really not important. Tossing and turning and struggling to make a zingy start to each new day.

Director: Jane Glennie (UK)

Born in Rustington, West Sussex (UK). Trained as a typographer by the University of Reading. Jane Glennie practiced for many years as a jobbing freelance designer. Moving towards contemporary art, she took her Masters degree in Art & Space (Distinction) at Kingston University, London. Her work about ambivalent motherhood has been exhibited by ProCreate Project in London in 2017 and in M.A.M.A. issue #23. Her film work has been shown at Digital Graffiti festival in Florida (USA); by PoetryFilm at the Hackney Picturehouse (UK) and Reykjavik (Iceland); in Art Language Location in Cambridge (UK); on Visual Container TV as part of the 29th Festival Les Instants Vidéo (France); and by Visible Poetry Project at the New York Poetry Festival (USA). This year her work was awarded a Jury Special Mention at the 3rd Weimar Poetry Film Festival (Germany) and 4th Place at the Poole Poetry Film Competition.



Conquest and Prison (8:23)

Poems: Oscar’s Journey and Child’s Play

by Oscar Buthelezi, Lorin Sookool and Julia Wilson

Synopsis – Conquest and Prison is a two-part suite of site-specific dance films set in Grahamstown, South Africa. Part I –– Oscar’s Journey –– is a solo performance by Oscar Buthelezi, the first African choreographer to win the prestigious Kurt Jooss Prize (Road 2016). This personal work combines spoken word and a performance at British built Ft. Selwyn. Part II –– Child’s Play–– features Lorin Sookool and Julia Wilson at the Old Gaol, which imprisoned 1000’s of black South Africans. This virtual duet attempts to reclaim and re-imagine this site of suffering. Dance is a form of a visual poetry. The words of the dancers reverberate in the space between past and present in South Africa.

Director: Mark Freeman (USA)

Mark Freeman is a Professor of Television, Film and New Media in the School of Theatre, Television and Film at San Diego State University. He has produced and directed, written and edited programs for broadcast on American public television. Freeman’s films have screened at national and international festivals and won numerous awards including a Gold Apple at the National Educational Film and Video Festival, a Certificate of Merit at the Chicago International Film Festival and a Red Ribbon at the American Film and Video Festival. They are in the collection of libraries and universities throughout the country, and have screened at museums including the Museo do Oriente (Lisbon), Weltmuseum (Vienna), Hong-Gah Museum (Taipei), National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, the Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of Natural History, the American Museum of Natural History and the Museum of Modern Art (NY).



The Desktop Metaphor (2:48)

Poem: The Desktop Metaphor

by Caleb Parkin

Synopsis – Scanning through an isolation of life. The Desktop Metaphor is a film of Caleb Parkin’s second placed poem in the National Poetry Competition 2016.

Director: Helmie Stil (UK)

Helmie Stil is a Dutch filmmaker living and working in the UK. After graduating at the Utrecht School of Arts she has been researching, directing and producing her own films, since 2006. She loves making poetic documentaries and film poems. Her award winning documentaries and film poems have been shown on national television and international film festivals. Filmpoem and the Poetry Society commissioned her latest film poem The Desktop Metaphor. Helmie also organised the Filmpoem Festival 2017 at the independent cinema Depot in Lewes. She is the director and founder of poetrycinema, an independent small film company making films that are inspired by poetry. At the moment Helmie is working on a new film in association with the poetry society. For more about Helmie visit www.helmiestil.nl



The Shadow (4:19)

Poem: The Shadow

by Lucy English

Synopsis – The use of video technology to reveal poetic aspects of the landscape that cannot be seen with the eyes alone (high and low shutter speeds, time dilation and compression, focal length extremes, all these combined at times with a moving camera), fractured reflections on ice, ice and water, and shadow traces permanently left by the photographer on the landscape only in the recorded images combine with an unsettling soundscape to provide a visceral representation of the psychological experience of depression and recovery in Pamela Falkenberg and Jack Cochran’s film poem of The Shadow by Lucy English, for her Book of Hours project, thebookofhours.org.

Directors: Pamela Falkenberg and Jack Cochran (USA)

Pamela Falkenberg is an independent filmmaker who received her PhD from the University of Iowa and taught at Northern Illinois University, St.Mary’s College, and the University of Notre Dame. She directed the largest student film society in the US while she was at the University of Iowa, and also ran films series for the Snite Museum of Art in South Bend, IN. Her experimental film with Dan Curry, Open Territory, received an individual filmmaker grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as grants from the Center for New Television and the Indiana Arts Council. OT was screened at numerous film festivals, including the AFI Video Festival, and was nominated for a regional Emmy. Her other films include museum installations, scholarly/academic hybrid works shown at film conferences, and a documentary commissioned by the Peace Institute at the University of Notre Dame. She wants to make lots of different kinds of films with Jack, but she is especially proud to have been the one who suggested that Jack’s poems should be made into films.

Jack Cochran is an independent filmmaker who has produced, directed, or shot a variety of experimental and personal projects. As a DP he has extensive experience shooting commercials, independent features, and documentaries. His varied commercial client list includes BMW, Ford, Nissan, Fujifilm, Iomega, Corum Watches, and Forte Hotels. His features and documentaries have shown at the Sundance, Raindance, Telluride, Tribeca, Edinburgh, Chicago, Houston, and Taos film Festivals, winning several honors. His commercials and documentaries have won Silver Lions from Cannes, a BAFTA (British Academy Award), Peabody Awards, and Cable Aces. Some notable credits: Director of Photography on Brian Griffin’s Claustrofoamia, Cinematography for Antony Thomas’ Tank Man, Director/Cinematographer of Viento Nocturno, and Cinematographer of Ramin Niami’s feature film Paris. Jack was trained at the University of Iowa Creative Writers Workshop as well as the University of Iowa film studies program. He has written poetry all his life, but he never knew what to do with it until he shared his notebooks with Pam, who said, “You’re a filmmaker — shouldn’t your poems be films?”



Curtain Pierced With Light (3:12)

Poem: Curtain Pierced With Light

by Jenene Ravesloot

Synopsis – There are Shadows at every turn….both real and imagined

Director: Paul Broderick (USA)

Paul is an award winning film maker. His films have been screened in numerous festivals around the world.



The Sundial (3:41)

Poem: The Sundial

by Lucy English

Synopsis – The Book of Hours is a contemporary re-imagining of a Medieval book of hours. The Book of Hours is a calendar of poetry films. There is a poetry film for now and for different times of day, for every month of the year. The Sundial is one of these poetry films that was made in collaboration between Lucia Sellars and Lucy English.

Director: Lucia Sellars (UK)

Lucia Sellars is a poet, an environmental scientist and a quiet observer. She published a pamphlet at 18, after winning the Premio Joven Contest in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. She has also published in magazines such as The Response (Fabrica Art Gallery – Brighton), Cronopis (Barcelona), Alba (London), Datableed (online zine), and Tears on the Fence. She started to perform in Oxford in 2014 at The Catweazle, and was part of Poetry Can F*Off, by Heathcote Williams in 2015. Her video-poems have been projected at the Athens International Video Poetry Festival 2016 in Greece, Film Poem Festival 2017 in Lewes, UK and the 2018 Film and Video Poetry Symposium in L.A., USA. Her recent published piece is The Quiet Life of Walls.



Dali, Carey’s Lane, Cork (Dali used to be the Pav)