In partnership with the
 Indie
Cork Festival of Independent Film & Music

15th October 2017

(2pm and 4pm @ The Village Hall)

 
5th Ó Bhéal Poetry-Film Competition

The competition shortlist of 30 films will be screened in two parts, at the Blacknight Festival Centre, in The Village Hall, Patrick’s Quay, Cork city.

The films were chosen from 186 submissions from 29 countries, completed in the last two years. This year the shortlisted entries represent thirteen countries: Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, Germany, Greece, India, Ireland, Portugal, Scotland, Spain, Ukraine & the US.

Our 2017 judges, poet Lani O’Hanlon and filmmaker Shaun O’Connor, selected one winner to receive the IndieCork award for best poetry film.

Our congratulations to winner Kayla Jeanson from Canada for her fantastic poetry-film, Descrambled Eggs.


 

Tickets to each screening are €5.50 (conc. €5.00)


 




Competition Shortlist – Screening A (57:42)

Sunday 15th October @ 2.00pm

The Village Hall, Patrick’s Quay. Cork




Lithopedion (1:55)

Poem: Lithopedion

by Cindy St. Onge

Synopsis – This video poem is about a rare condition in which the fetus dies, then calcifies in utero. Some women carry these “stone babies” in their bellies for decades.

Director: Cindy St. Onge (USA)

Cindy St. Onge is a multi-media poet whose video poems have been screened in video festivals in the US and Europe, and have been showcased at MovingPoems.com. Her poems have appeared recently in Timberline Review, Dappled Things, Right Hand Pointing, Gravel, Apeiron Review and other print and online journals.



Poem for Rent (1:30)

Poem: Poem for Rent

by Kim Mannix

Synopsis – A bouncy video coupling real estate and meaning.

 
 

Director: Marie Craven (Australia)

Marie Craven assembles videos from poetry, music, voice, moving and still images, by various artists around the world. Created via the internet, the pieces are collaborative in a way that belongs to the 21st century. Social networking and open media licensing are key to the process. Since 2014, Marie has put together 50 video poems. Prior to this she collaborated extensively as a vocalist for electronic musicians, also via the internet. During the 1990s and early 2000s she wrote and directed short narrative and experimental films that were screened and awarded widely at international film festivals. Her earliest involvement in media was in the mid-1980s with super 8 film-making. Her Dictionary Illustrations, from a poem by Sarah Sloat, won the 2016 Ó Bhéal Poetry Film Competition.

vimeo.com/mariecraven



Gone Is Syria, Gone (7:54)

Poem: Gone Is Syria, Gone

by Jazra Khaleed

Synopsis – One day Syria decides to leave. She gathers up her words and her personal affairs, her airspace and ground forces, she takes her geopolitical position, and she leaves.

Director: Jazra Khaleed (Greece)

Jazra Khaleed (b. 1979, Grozny/Chechnya) lives in Athens, writes and publishes exclusively in Greek, and is known as a poet, editor, translator and filmmaker. His poetry has been widely translated for publications in Europe, the US, Australia and Japan. The film rendition of his poem about the immigrant situation, The AEGEAN or the Anus of Death (2014), won prizes at the Zebra Poetry Film Festival and the Balkans Beyond Borders Short Film Festival.



Arctica:
What I Should Have Said
(3:02)

Poem: What I Should Have Said

by Stevie Ronnie

Synopsis – The 1st Filmpoem of the Arctica triptych. It takes us into the air as we settle in to listen – then brings us back to ground in the Arctic. This is a love poem to the family that Stevie left behind, originally composed shortly before he set off on his Arctic journey.

Arctica is a series of interlinked artworks, borne from writer and artist Stevie Ronnie’s 2013 journey to the High Arctic through the Arctic Circle international residency programme. As part of Arctica, Alastair Cook was commissioned by Stevie to make a triptych of Filmpoems with sound by Italian composer Luca Nasciuti. The films also feature Arctic footage shot by US-based artist Michael Eckblad alongside found footage from Alastair’s collection.

Director: Alastair Cook (UK)

Alastair Cook works with photography and video to explore communities undergoing significant transformation and to consider the relationship between between individuals and the landscapes they occupy. He is founder of award winning documentary photography collective Documenting Britain, driven by his desire to document the British Isles. Alastair is also the founder of artists’ moving image project Filmpoem, a project dedicated to the filming of words – Filmpoem has grown to become an international poetry, film, festival and workshop project – www.filmpoem.com. He is currently making work as artist in residence at Kaunas Photography Gallery in Lithuania, supported by Street Level Photoworks in Glasgow.



Stars Setting (2:18)

Poem: Stars Setting

by Payson R. Stevens

Synopsis – A video-poem on the gift of persistence, union, and love. Symbolist imagery, including water at sea, shadows dancing, and human hands permeate the piece.

Director: Payson R. Stevens (USA)

Stevens has two parallel career tracks: science/science communication; art, film/video. Lives 6 months/yr in India. Film awards: a CINE Golden Eagle, NY Film Fest. Presidential Design Award: Bill Clinton. VideoTonePoems™/VTPs are short, edgy multimedia montages that speak to both hemispheres of the brain in energetic mash-ups of words, images & music all created by the director.



iRony (7:57)

Poem: Seven Billion

by Radheya Jegatheva

Synopsis – A film that explores the relationship between man and technology … told from the perspective of a phone.

 

Director: Radheya Jegatheva (Australia)

Radheya Jegatheva is a young Perth based Australian filmmaker who was born in Johor, Malaysia in 1999 to parents of South Korean and Malaysian ancestry. He is a 1st year Bachelor of Commerce student at Curtin University in Western Australia. Radheya’s skill set cuts across a number of creative areas and he has won prizes for his creations in the fields of writing, poetry, art and film making.



The Clock Doctor (2:48)

Poem: The Clock Doctor

by Emmet O’Brien

Synopsis – Two figures wander a dark landscape and sift through fragments of their lives looking for insight and peace.

 

Director: Emmet O’Brien (Ireland)

Emmet O’Brien has to date made eight short films ranging from ensemble comedies to intimate two hander character pieces to animated and genre exercises. His work has been described as bittersweet whimsy and this is a label he is more than happy with. He was also heavily involved as co-writer, producer and performer in the worldwide smash hit video for the musician Hozier and his anthemic modern classic “Take me to Church”. He works at deep Red Productions a Cork based video production company that creates music videos, short films as well as corporate work. He writes across many disciplines, including poetry, but this is the first time he has fused the two art forms together.



Offering (3:22)

Poem: Offering

by Paul Perry

Synopsis – We should pray and be grateful for what was simple. If there were some salve for your pain, some solace I could lend, I would offer it to you willingly, and with love…

Director: Marc Neys aka Swoon (Belgium)

By applying a poetic and often metaphorical language, Neys (aka Swoon) created dozens of videopoems, upon which thoughts that have apparently just been developed are manifested: notes are made and then crossed out again, ‘mistakes’ are repeated. Poems are often dissociated from their original meaning, layers of language and visuals are being build upon endlessly. He tries creates works in which atmospheric moments of evocation and suspense are not part of a narrative thread. The drama unfolds elsewhere while the build-up of tension is frozen or repeats itself. His works appear as dreamlike images in which fiction and reality meet, well-known tropes merge, meanings shift, past and present fuse. Time and memory always play a key role. Creating compositions and video’s that generate tranquil poetic images that leave traces and balances on the edge of recognition. His works are on the one hand touchingly beautiful, on the other hand painfully dark. Again and again, the artist leaves us orphaned with a mix of conflicting feelings and thoughts. Marc Neys (aka Swoon) currently lives and works in Mechelen.



Hexapod (4:23)

Poem: Hexapod by Ian Gibbins

Synopsis – “nearly extinct … we burrow… far from toxic miasmata … we will wait … once more fill the skies …”   Brooding, breeding underground, the insects wait until the time is right to escape the confines of gravity and environmental degradation.

Director: Ian Gibbins (Australia)

Ian Gibbins is a widely published poet, video-artist and electronic musician. Until 2014, he was also an internationally recognised neuroscientist and Professor of Anatomy. His poetry, videos, and music have been short-listed for several national prizes, featured on ABC Radio National, and exhibited in major public art works and gallery installations. His recent video-poems have had considerable international exposure. He has published three books of poetry: Urban Biology (2012); The Microscope Project: How Things Work (with artists, Catherine Truman and Deb Jones, 2014); and Floribunda (with artist, Judy Morris, 2015).

For more see www.iangibbins.com.au



Night Launderette North Street (2:46)

Poem: Night Launderette North Street

by David Punter

Synopsis – The launderette is warm and well ordered everything in its place but outside there are those who are not well ordered or well washed.

Director: Diana Taylor (UK)

Diana Taylor worked for the BBC TV as film editor and director. She has been working with Bristol Poets making poetry films since 2009 and her films have been shown in major venues in around Bristol including the Watershed, the Arnolfini, Colston Hall M Shed and the BBC Big Screen. Diana’s poetry films have also been selected for the Portabello Film Festival London, The Zebra International Poetry Festival Berlin, Annual Programme Without Frontiers Barcelona, Liberated Words Poetry Film Festival Bristol, Visible Verse Poetry Film Festival Vancover, Sadho International Poetry Film Festival New Delhi, Athens International Poetry Film Festival, Rabbit Heart Poetry Film Festival USA. Her poetry films have been shortlisted for an award at the Kiev International Poetry Film Festival, Offaly Museum Ireland 100 year anniversary of the Easter Uprising 1916, The Lighthouse Cinema Pool Poetry Film Competition, ATTICUS Publications USA, STIGMART European Filmmakers, Cheltenham Poetry Festival, Ó Bheál Poetry Film Festival Cork & Video Bardo International Film Festival Buenos Aires, plus others.

Visit Diana’s youtube channel at www.youtube.com/user/taylor9ization



Philips Modern Atlas
of The World
(2:19)

Poem: Philips Modern Atlas of The World

by Colm Scully

Synopsis – I love maps and often interpret the most banal of surfaces as river basins or mountain ranges. How that proclivity blends into a poetry film about childhood memory and geopolitics I’m not quite sure. Pretend you are turning the pages of the boy’s atlas.

 
Director: Colm Scully (Ireland)

Colm Scully is from Cork and has been making and collaborating on poetry films for a number of years. Some of them have been shortlisted for competitions in Ireland and America. His first collection of poems What News, Centurions? was published by New Binary press in 2014.



I Remember (2:16)

Poem: I Remember by Anne Sexton

Synopsis – This poetry film started with a set of stills from a recent stay in southern Portugal. A rented house, tropical details lent themselves to a romantic memory. Anne Sexton’s poem, “I Remember” fit the tone of the images in which no people are visible but traces of human life, only visual artifacts remain.

Director: Lisa Seidenberg (USA)

Lisa Seidenberg makes documentaries and short experimental films and is currently focused on text-based and poetry work. Her experimental films have been shown at the International Berlin Film Festival, the London Documentary Film Festival, the International Video Poetry Festival (Greece), Experiments in Cinema (New Mexico), Moscow Video Art Festival (Russia), and in art exhibitions at the A.I.R. Gallery (NYC) and Group Global 3000 (Berlin), as well as at Art of the NorthEast.

Her website is: www.missmuffett.com



Beton Langue (4:01)

Poem: Beton Langue

by Dora Mortimer

Synopsis – A film-poem about the cut-ups between transient spaces – part of the Disappear Here project.

 

Director: Richard Houguez (UK)

Richard Houguez is a visual artist, born in the Lower Eastern Green area of Coventry, now living and working in London. His projects are predominantly research-based and consultation-oriented, exploringe xpressions of community and intimacy, heritage and sense of place. He often collaborates or works collectively across disciplines of film, photography, drawing, writing and mapping. Previous projects include OOTO Places, Kent; Intersections, Nottingham; Summerlab 2014, UK, and UV Spa, V&A lates, London.



The Road (10:00)

Poem: Three untitled poems

by Aoise Tutty

Synopsis – “Last year I spent 6 months in Asia. I collected memories, experiences, insights and footage of my time there. I pondered, observed, wrote and witnessed many a beautiful moment during this time. I met, interacted or became friends with many hundreds if not thousands of people. I had many firsts, and learnt many things. As a human being living on this vast and expansive earth filled with wonders so rich and diverse, it is easy to sometimes forget that it is possible to have an adventure with any one, any thing and at any time.

Although you don’t have to travel the globe to experience the joy of adventure. This particular journey opened a doorway to a new awareness within me, which I have subsequently brought ‘home’. Almost a year later I began to re-explore what this journey meant to me. How it felt and how it could be expressed to anyone who was not there with me, inside my head, inside my body. When editing the film I chose to approach it in a non linear style, instead inviting the viewer to watch the piece in an experiential ‘feeling’ way and to observe the rhythm in a similar way as to how one would observe the breath in a meditation practice.”

Director: Aoise Tutty (Ireland)

Aoise Tutty is a visual artist and writer primarily working in the fields of filmmaking and photography. She is drawn to stories and ways of expressing which strive towards empowering and raising consciousness. She believes that the more we learn to reconnect to the natural world and our own inner wisdom we will be able to (re)find the flow and harmony each of us innately desires. ‘Before long the indelible wisdom be the change can transform into I am the change. This is where the beauty of the journey lies and the story unfolds most magnificently’



Impression, Canal (1:32)

Poem: Impression, Canal

by Bernard O’Rourke

Synopsis – This film is an adaptation of my own poem, which imagines a journey of a wanderer from another place and time along Dublin’s Grand Canal, specifically the stretch where it passes between Portobello & Rathmines. Along the way he gets a glimpse of the character of the area though the people that populate it. For the film, I wanted to capture that impressionistic sense of place – little details caught by an unfamiliar eye that hint at a larger picture. I wanted to create an loose, inexactly defined landscape that drew out the text of the poem, accompanying the sense of the piece rather than literally depicting the text of it.

Director: Bernard O’Rourke (Ireland)

Bernard O’Rourke is a writer and filmmaker. His poetry and fiction have appeared in The Tangerine, The Penny Dreadful, The Incubator, Queen Mob’s Teahouse, The Bogman’s Canon, The Honest Ulsterman, TheEEEL, The Bohemyth, and Wordlegs. As a spoken word artist, he has performed at Lingo Festival, NYF Dublin, Culture Night, Just Words, Indie Spirit Dublin, The Monday Echo, Flying South, and more. His Twitter account is @guyserious. He lives in Dublin.




Competition Shortlist – Screening B (57:33)

Sunday 15th October @ 4.00pm

The Village Hall, Patrick’s Quay. Cork




Bunstop (3:43)

Poem: Bunstop

by Paul Summers

Synopsis – There is beauty and pain in the dirt and shadows. Film-maker Dan Douglas collaborates with Poet Paul Summers and composer Roma Yagnik to produce a mesmerising and alternative glimpse of Newcastle upon Tyne.

Director: Dan Douglas (UK)

Dan Douglas is a freelance filmmaker, camera operator, editor, videographer and photographer based in Newcastle Upon Tyne in the North East of the UK.



#domesticliteraturemovement (3:15)

Poem: #theheartsplaceisthekitchen

by rawquel

Synopsis – Décio Pignatari said that poetry seems to be more on the music side. We do not need anything else. We agree. To know this project, please only use the ear and the eye. If you want to explore this subject using more senses, you have to dive into the extensive bibliography outside this fortress. At a time when the publishing market gives us to understand that poetry does not “sell”, we take the opportunity to remember that errant barriers encourage the search for alternatives of dissemination. We thank in doubt, a new impulse to move ideas and to create. We have gone far beyond the Aristotelian fashion word of ‘imitation’ to concretize in the place where words dance, while listening to music. Domestic tasks are the creative process itself. The poems are from a first collection titled the place of the heart is the kitchen, part of #domesticliteraturemovement.

Director: James Jacket (Portugal)

James Jacket is the solo project of a musician who co-founded the band Les Baton Rouge. rawquel is a portuguese artist who creates visual poetry. “Silverware occupies an oversized place in children’s minds (well, children raised in countries where forks, knives & spoons are the dominant utensils) and I basically humanized silverware in a delightfully “unheimlich” way & combined it with intimate poetry.”



The Last Days (3:33)

Poem: The Last Days

by Lucy English

Synopsis – A gentle lullaby for dark times. Created for the multi-artist poetry film project, The Book of Hours.

Director: Marie Craven (Australia)

Marie Craven assembles videos from poetry, music, voice, moving and still images, by various artists around the world. Created via the internet, the pieces are collaborative in a way that belongs to the 21st century. Social networking and open media licensing are key to the process. Since 2014, Marie has put together 50 video poems. Prior to this she collaborated extensively as a vocalist for electronic musicians, also via the internet. During the 1990s and early 2000s she wrote and directed short narrative and experimental films that were screened and awarded widely at international film festivals. Her earliest involvement in media was in the mid-1980s with super 8 film-making. Her Dictionary Illustrations, from a poem by Sarah Sloat, won the 2016 Ó Bhéal Poetry Film Competition.

vimeo.com/mariecraven



Oracle of a found shoe (1:50)

Poem: Oracle of a found shoe

by Mustafa Stitou

Synopsis – Will you really lose your love if you rediscover yourself?

 
 

Director: Angie Bogachenko (Ukraine)

Anzhela Siveria (Bogachenko) is an illustrator, designer, filmmaker and essayist. She was born in Donetsk, grew up in Mykolaiv and now lives in Kiev. Anzhela takes part in various literary, film and videopoetry festivals. She has two higher education degrees: landscape and interior design (KNUCiA) and screenwriter of TV and film (KNUCiT by I. Karpenko-Kary). She was participated in art exhibitions, like: “Ballpoint pen” (in the galleries “Karas” and “Arsenal» – Kiev, 2015-2016), «House of LEVELS’» (project on GOGOLFEST), «COW» (Dnepropetrovsk, 2015). Anzhela was finalist at the illustrations competition “Victor Pelevin is looking for artists.” Illustrating the book “Chapaev and Pustota” (V. Pelevin, the publishing house “EKSMO”, Moscow, Russia, 2015).

In autumn 2014 Anzhela was selected by famous Ukrainian writers Taras Prohasko, Jurij Andruhovich and Vasyl Karpyuk as a resident for their project of young ukrainian literary writers “Stanislavsky phenomenon” (Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine). Anzhela has participated and won prizes in: poetry festival “Waterline” (Mykolaiv, 2015), «CYCLOP» (Kyiv, 2012-2015), «Zebra» (Berlin, 2014), “Days of Ukrainian cinema in Spain” (Spain, Catalonia, 2014), “Chestnut House” (2013), “Open Night” (Kyiv, 2015), “Molodist” (Kyiv, 2015), “DoctorClip” (Rome, Italy – 2015), “Lviv’s publishers Forum” (Lviv, 2015).



Appear (7:26)

Poem: Appear

by Tanja Leonhardt

Synopsis – This video is part of my current Landart-project “languages of silk – the movements of the chain of signs”. I am working on it for six years now; it is both, work with language and visual Arts. Like most environmental artists I use video and photography to document the installations and the quick passing moment. The special light and nature of the far north (Scotland/Orkney) creates such a wonderful, reduced, sometimes almost surreal atmosphere that inspires me to some exclusive themes: green ocean turtle, jelly fish, … I combine these symbols/arcetypes with writing, barely poems, just fragments or echoes of it.

Director: Tanja Leonhardt (Germany)

Tanja Leonhardt, born 1966 in Groß-Gerau, Germany, married, two children. 1991 Master of Fine Arts, University Mayence, with major subjects Lettering, Calligraphy, Typography. Further education: wood and textile handling, video and photography as well as curses in philosophy and psychology. Numerous exhibitions, art-performances and readings of own literary work. Articles and lectures about art and the art of writing. Current project: „Languages of silk in nature or the movements of the chain of signs“.

What I do concretely: I write and print my design on large, transparent, colored silk banners and install them in nature. I document the interaction of silk and nature while the vulnerable material is drifting and waving in the air or in water. The lyrics and pictures of the silk get into a dialoge with the light, the air, the surrounding plants, waves, stones, … and sometimes all the elements together creates rare, perfect moments. Just like big flags, but instead of pointing to any nation or persuading us to buy another product or maybe pray to another God, they account for conditio humana which is connected inseparably to nature.



Monkey Mind (4:11)

Poem: Monkey Mind

by Payson R. Stevens

Synopsis – A video-poem mash up reflecting on the human condition and the unending need for more, more, and more. Video shot in remote Indian Himalayas, Mumbai, New York City and in flight.

Director: Payson R. Stevens (USA)

Stevens has two parallel career tracks: science/science communication; art, film/video. Lives 6 months/yr in India. Film awards: a CINE Golden Eagle, NY Film Fest. Presidential Design Award: Bill Clinton. VideoTonePoems™/VTPs are short, edgy multimedia montages that speak to both hemispheres of the brain in energetic mash-ups of words, images & music all created by the director.



Descrambled Eggs (4:14)

Poem: Descrambled Eggs

by Steve Currie

Synopsis – Poetry, dance, and eggs collide in this short film by Canadian artist Kayla Jeanson. Poet Steve Currie grapples with the origins of his existence and limitations of his corporeality.
 
Director: Kayla Jeanson (Canada)

Kayla Jeanson is a Winnipeg-based filmmaker who specializes in producing screendance and work on the edge of documentary. A producer/director for her company Parachute Media Lab, she has developed a wide range of work including broadcast and commercial web video. She is also a trained contemporary dancer and choreographer.


 
 
 
 
 



City of my Heart
(Ciudad de mi Corazón)
(4:11)

Poem: Ciudad de mi Corazón

by Kostas Petsas

Synopsis – A personal glimpse into Madrid, an experimental urban cityscape, an ode to life through a dance.

Director: Kostas Petsas (Greece)

A visual storyteller, co-founder of Arte Cinematica in Greece. He has a long term experience in producing storytelling wedding films, mastering the art of anamorphic lenses and creating corporate videos. He believes that mixing different forms of art, such as poetry, photography, music and video can enhance the storytelling process and have a higher emotional impact. “Ciudad de mi corazón” is an attempt to do short narrative in the form of what could be considered as “street cinematography”. This is a personal narrative, conceived, written and filmed all in one week in Madrid.



America, Northumberland (5:08)

Poem: America, Northumberland

by Robin Kidson

Synopsis – The poet describes the influence of american music and culture when he was growing up in Northumberland in the 1960’s.

Director: Diana Taylor (UK)

Diana Taylor worked for the BBC TV as film editor and director. She has been working with Bristol Poets making poetry films since 2009 and her films have been shown in major venues in around Bristol including the Watershed, the Arnolfini, Colston Hall M Shed and the BBC Big Screen. Diana’s poetry films have also been selected for the Portabello Film Festival London, The Zebra International Poetry Festival Berlin, Annual Programme Without Frontiers Barcelona, Liberated Words Poetry Film Festival Bristol, Visible Verse Poetry Film Festival Vancover, Sadho International Poetry Film Festival New Delhi, Athens International Poetry Film Festival, Rabbit Heart Poetry Film Festival USA. Her poetry films have been shortlisted for an award at the Kiev International Poetry Film Festival, Offaly Museum Ireland 100 year anniversary of the Easter Uprising 1916, The Lighthouse Cinema Pool Poetry Film Competition, ATTICUS Publications USA, STIGMART European Filmmakers, Cheltenham Poetry Festival, Ó Bheál Poetry Film Festival Cork & Video Bardo International Film Festival Buenos Aires, plus others.

Visit Diana’s youtube channel at www.youtube.com/user/taylor9ization



Aleppo (4:15)

Poem: Aleppo

by Howie Good

Synopsis – Can we apologize before they fade for good?

 
 

Director: Marc Neys aka Swoon (Belgium)

By applying a poetic and often metaphorical language, Neys (aka Swoon) has created dozens of videopoems, upon which thoughts that have apparently just been developed are manifested: notes are made and then crossed out again, ‘mistakes’ are repeated. Poems are often dissociated from their original meaning, layers of language and visuals are being built upon endlessly. He tries to create works in which atmospheric moments of evocation and suspense are not part of a narrative thread. The drama unfolds elsewhere while the build-up of tension is frozen or repeats itself. His works appear as dreamlike images in which fiction and reality meet, well-known tropes merge, meanings shift, past and present fuse. Time and memory always play a key role. Creating compositions and videos that generate tranquil poetic images which leave traces and balances on the edge of recognition. His works are on the one hand touchingly beautiful, on the other hand painfully dark. Again and again, the artist leaves us orphaned with a mix of conflicting feelings and thoughts. Marc Neys (aka Swoon) currently lives and works in Mechelen.



Sun-Earth Diglossia/Dancepoem (3:03)

Poem: Sun-Earth Diglossia

by Eleni Cay

Synopsis – A conversational duet between the Sun and the Earth, in search for a ying-yang balance or perhaps a quest for unity and departure from human-imposed hierarchies. If the Earth spoke to the Sun, what would she say? And if the Moon talked to the Sun, would they remember the times when they were one? The perennial themes of love and separation somewhat always find their way into a poem…

Director: Eleni Cay (UK)

Eleni Cay is a Slovakian-born poet living in Manchester, UK. Her poems were published in two pamphlets – Colours of the Swan and Autumn Dedications – and featured in MK Calling 2013 & 2015. She’s widely published in anthologies such as Mother’s Milk, poetry magazines such as Envoi and Atticus Review, on Button Poetry and on the ‘best poetry videos on the web’ (‘Moving Poems’). A full collection of translated poems was published by Parthian Books in July 2017 and a pamphlet is due in autumn 2017 by Eyewear Press (The Lorgnette Pamphlet Series).



Lucas (4:11)

Poem: Lucas

by Charles Olsen

Synopsis – Lucas goes out on his daily adventures, but what makes him tick? A New Zealand poet, a Colombian writer and a Spanish comedian teamed up to find out…

 
 
Director: Charles Olsen (Spain)

Charles Olsen (b.New Zealand, 1969) moved to the UK in 1981 and to Spain in 2003. His short film The dance of the brushes won second prize in the Flamenco Short Film Festival, Madrid, 2010, and his paintings have been shown in Madrid, Barcelona, Oporto, Paris, Wellington, and the Saatchi Gallery, London. He has published the collections of poetry Sr Citizen (Amargord, 2011) and Antípodas (Huerga & Fierro, 2016) and has participated en various poetry festivals and anthologies. He has been awarded the XIII distinction Poetas de Otros Mundos (Poets from Other Worlds) by the Fondo Poético Internacional in Spain, 2017. He runs the online poetry project Palabras Prestadas (Given Words) and alongside Lilián Pallares he runs the audiovisual production company antenablue. Their work has been shown in the ZEBRA Poetry Film Festival (Berlin), Liberated Words (Bristol), Sinestesia (Barcelona), ‘Cruces y Convergencias’ in La Neomudéjar (Madrid), Filmpoem Festival FelixPakhuis (Antwerp), and Festival Silêncio (Lisbon), among others.



Shoes Without Feet (1:54)

Poem: Shoes Without Feet

by Caroline Rumley

Synopsis – After the chaos of the Nazi march in Charlottesville, one voice is conspicuously absent.

 
 

Director: Caroline Rumley (USA)

Caroline Rumley is a multi-modal storyteller from Maiden, North Carolina. After stints in D.C., L. A., Istanbul, Berlin and eastern Tennessee, she landed in Atlanta, where she is surrounded by her husband, daughter, a sturdy pit bull, and a geriatric cat. She holds an M.F.A. in Theatrical Design and is currently studying Film. Her recent work includes both moving and still images.



I lost my shoes on Rachel Street (4:27)

Poem: I lost my shoes on Rachel Street

by Rachel McCrum

Synopsis – Filmed in Montreal, Edinburgh and North Berwick, this videopoem is about translocation, and also mouths, and teeth, and space, and absence, and tongues, and stillness, and a crazy looking Olympic stadium.

Directors: Rachel McCrum & Jonathan Lamy (Scotland & Québec, Canada)

Rachel McCrum grew up in Donaghadee, Northern Ireland, lived in Edinburgh from 2010 to 2016, where she was the Broad of cult spoken word cabaret Rally & Broad, the inaugural BBC Scotland Poet in Residence and a recipient of an RLS Fellowship. She has published two pamphlets with Stewed Rhubarb Press: The Glassblower Dances (2012) and Do Not Alight Here Again (2015). The First Blast To Awaken Women Degenerate was published by Freight Books in 2017. She now lives in Montreal.

Jonathan Lamy is a multidisciplinary poet and performer based in Montreal. He has published three collections of poetry (Editions du Noroit), and was responsible for Rendez-vous video-poésie at the Montreal Poetry Festival. His poetry has been translated into English and Chinese. His practice combines participative reading, sound poetry, poetry-action, intervention in public spaces and video.



How it Starts (2:12)

Poem: How it Starts

by Patricia Killelea

Synopsis – A poetry film that engages themes of politics, internet culture, and cycles of intergenerational violence. The foundation is language. Everything else is just breath and motion.

Director: Patricia Killelea (USA)

Patricia Killelea is an Assistant Professor of English at Northern Michigan University, where she teaches courses in Native American literature and poetry writing in their MFA program. Her poetry films have been featured at Moving Poems, Poetry Film Live, and Atticus Review. She is the author of Other Suns (Swan Scythe Press), and her text-based poetry is published widely in the United States.



The Village Hall, Patrick’s Quay, Cork