Ó Bhéal’s 7th International Poetry-Film competition

at IndieCork Festival of Independent Film & Music

Sunday 13th October 2019

4pm and 5.30pm
 
@ Blacknight Festival Centre, Dali

The shortlist of 31 films featured below will be screened in two parts, at the Blacknight Festival Centre, Dali, Carey’s Lane, Cork city.

The films were chosen from 198 submissions from 118 filmmakers in 33 countries, all completed within two years of the submission opening date. The shortlist represents eleven countries: Australia, Canada, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Isle of Man, Jordan/Palestine, Spain, the UK & the USA.

Our 2019 judges, poet Stanley Notte and poet-filmmaker Colm Scully, selected one winner to receive the IndieCork award for best poetry-film.

Our congratulations to winner Fiona Aryan from Ireland for her poetry-film, Virginia gave me Roses.


 

Tickets to each screening are €6.00

 

 




Competition Shortlist – Screening A (53:12)

Sunday 13th October @ 4.00pm

Dali, Carey’s Lane, Cork




for those who don’t know chocolate (3:37)

Poem: for those who don’t know chocolate

by Amirah Al Wassif
 

Synopsis – The Poverty and refugee crisis is a world wide calamity. It can only be remedied by a world wide effort.

Director: Paul Broderick (USA)

Paul Broderick has been making poetry films and short films for five years. With a performing Arts background and a penchant for the Noir, Paul brings a unique interpretation to his films. Paul is an award-winning filmmaker. His films have been screened in numerous festivals around the world. Through his collaborative and often unexpected vision Paul describes his maxim; “The medium of film has no boundaries….There is no right or wrong, just expression”.
 



The Stranger (7:30)

Poem: The Stranger

by Jessamine O Connor

Synopsis – ‘The Stranger’ is a shadow-puppet poem-film about being an immigrant, in Ireland and abroad. Made in collaboration with Carmel Balfe*, of Little Gem Puppets, and with original acoustic music by Helen B Grehan, the film is narrated by Aoife ni Mhurchadha. It is brisk, bold and beautiful.

Director: Jessamine O Connor (Ireland)

Jessamine O Connor lives on the Sligo Roscommon border and has published five poetry chapbooks, with a collection coming out with Salmon Poetry in 2020. She has won the Poetry Ireland Butlers Café Competition 2017; the iYeats 2011; the Francis Ledwidge award 2011; and has been shortlisted for more, including the Hennessy Literary Award; Over the Edge New Writer of the Year; Cuirt New Writing Award; Red Line Book Festival; Dead Good Poetry; and the 2018 Poetry Ireland Love Your Bike competitions. This is her first film.

For more about Jessamine visit www.jessamineoconnor.com

In collaboration with Carmel Balfe: Carmel Balfe lives in Mayo where she is a professional puppeteer with Little Gem Puppets, and performs in both English and Irish. She was winner of the Best Children’s Film at the New York international film festival 2003. She designed and created all the shadow-puppets for this film.
 



The Angry Sleeper (2:18)

Poem: The Angry Sleeper

by Rosemary Norman

Synopsis – “The angry sleeper stalks his dreams/hard from night to night”. Dirk Bouts’ 1470 painting of demons carrying sinners off to Hell is the starting point for this not-quite-serious animated nightmare. Pachelbel’s famous canon played on a musical box is the accompaniment.

Director: Stuart Pound (UK)

Stuart Pound lives in London and has worked in film, digital video, sound and the visual arts since the early 1970’s. Since 1995 he has collaborated with the poet Rosemary Norman. Video work has been screened regularly in London and at international festivals. Screenings include: BFI London Film Festival EXPERIMENTA 2017, Holland Animation Film Festival (Utrecht) 2017. Ottawa International Animation Festival 2017, Festival international du film d’animation, Annecy, 2017.
 



Plasticnic (1:09)

Poem: Plasticnic

by Fiona Tinwei Lam

Synopsis – “Plasticnic” is an animated short that wryly depicts the extent and impact of the accumulation of plastic in the environment as people continue to purchase, use and discard single-use plastics. We seek out and enjoy nature while simultaneously (and obliviously) destroying it.

Directors: Fiona Tinwei Lam and Tisha Deb Pillai (Canada)

Fiona Tinwei Lam was born in Scotland, and has lived in Vancouver, Canada since the age of four. She has authored two poetry books and the children’s book. Her poetry and prose appear in over 30 anthologies, including The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2010. She has co-edited two anthologies of nonfiction and edited The Bright Well: Contemporary Canadian Poetry about Facing Cancer. Her video poems have been screened locally and internationally, including at the Zebra festival in 2014. She currently teaches creative writing at Simon Fraser University Continuing Studies in Vancouver, BC, Canada. For more about Fiona, visit www.fionalam.net

Tisha Deb Pillai was in born in India and currently resides in Vancouver BC, where she graduated with a Bachelor of Media Arts in Animation from Emily Carr University of Art and Design. Her animation film If You Fall has screened at various film festivals including Cinanima, Ottawa International Animation Festival, TIFF Canada’s Top Ten, NY International Children’s Film Festival, Northwest Animation Festival, Animation Nights New York, and Vancouver International Women in Film Festival. If You Fall has also been added to the permanent collection at the Education Department Resources at the Museum of Modern Art. As an animator living between Canada and India, her work has been inspired from two vastly distinct worlds of colours, cultures and ideas. For more visit vimeo.com/tishadebpillai.
 



Jephthah’s Daughter (4:38)

Poem: Jephthah’s Daughter

by Tova Beck-Friedman

Synopsis – Jephthah was a ruler in the ancient kingdom of Israel who went to war with his neighboring enemy. He vowed that on his triumphal return, the first one to greet him would be sacrificed to his God. It was unfortunate that the first one to greet him was his only daughter. Not only was she sacrificed, we never learn her name – she is only known as Jephthah’s Daughter.

Director: Tova Beck-Friedman (USA)

An artist, filmmaker, curator and a writer: Tova Beck-Friedman’s work has been shown in festivals, museums, galleries and on television including: The International Artists’ Museum, at the 50th Venice Biennale; The National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington DC; FIVAC Camagüey, Cuba; the 7th International Video Poetry Festival / Athens, Greece and The Jerusalem Cinematheque.
 



Rodeo Days (3:40)

Poem: Rodeo Days

by Marie Craven

Synopsis – ‛Rodeo Days’ is a personal film about my Australian ancestry and identity, and the longing to understand the meaning of home. It incorporates archival footage of mid-20th century rural life, given vibrant expression in a hybrid of spoken word, experimental film and music video.

Director: Marie Craven (Australia)

Marie Craven is a film-maker in Queensland, Australia, who has been making shorts for 35 years. Her work has exhibited extensively at international festivals and events, and gathered several awards. She has released over 60 video poems in the past five years, often made in net-collaboration with poets and other artists around the world. Over the decades, she has freelanced as a teacher of screen-writing at universities, technical colleges and community centres, a reviewer of films and books, an arts administrator, and a curator of film exhibitions, most notably the Australian National Focus at the 1994 Festival de Cine Experimental de Madrid. A major project in 2019-2020 is curating and managing a touring program of international video poems, titled ‛Poetry + Video’. Her first experience of film-making was in the mid-1980s, in the underground film community in Melbourne.
 



One Step Away (2:42)

Poem: One Step Away

by Caroline Rumley

Synopsis – On the importance of listening to dreams, and of words of encouragement

Director: Caroline Rumley (USA)

Caroline Rumley is a filmmaker and visual artist working with video, pictures, found footage, spoken word, text, and sound. She is interested in the visual narrative in its many forms, particularly in what Malcolm Gladwell calls a “thin-sliced instance,” that brief flash that tells you all you need to know. Her experimental, documentary, and poetry films have screened in the US and Europe. A video-based body of her work is included on Charlotte Cotton’s “Best of 2017” list in the British Journal of Photography. She works in Atlanta, where she lives with her family.
 



Postcards from a window (6:34)

Poem: Postcards from a window

by Lucia Sellars

Synopsis – A poem that reflects on windows.

Director: Lucia Sellars (UK)

Lucia Sellars is a poet, environmental scientist, and a quiet observer. She believes that in order to create anything and through any medium, you must have a revelation through an applied poetic state of being; then, creativity crafts itself out. Her film director statement is: The motion of poetry is like juggling. You pick a set of feelings and images, then rise them into the air, into the randomness of infinity. Then grab two realities and one ethereal substance.
 



In West Virginia (3:27)

Poem: In West Virginia

by Dave Bonta

Synopsis – Dave Bonta’s Haibun poem about an unexpected car breakdown in a small town, “In West Virginia,” the second poem in his recent book, Failed State, is the inspiration for this film poem, which finds arresting visual and aural correspondences among American landscapes taken over by strip malls, strip mines, and strips of highways.

Directors: Pamela Falkenberg and Jack Cochran (USA)

Jack Cochran and Pamela Falkenberg are making personal films together again under the name Outlier Moving Pictures. They hope their new films will be worthy of the name — avoiding the usual patterns and approaching their subject matter from the margins (which sounds better than saying that as filmmakers they’re oddballs and cranks). Pam and Jack met in graduate school and made films together when they were young. Jack went on to become a professional cinematographer working out of LA and London, while Pam stayed in the Midwest, where she was a college professor and independent filmmaker before dropping out to work in visual display.

Their first film together, “The Cost of Living,” based on some of Jack’s short poems, was accepted by several film festivals, including the Queens World Film Festival (2019), the Buffalo International Film Festival, the Denver Underground Film Festival, and the Cornwall Film Festival; was nominated for two awards at the 2019 Queens World and 2017 Jim Thorpe Film Festivals; and took the award for best experimental film at the 2016 WV FILMmakers Festival. Other short poetry films have screened at the Ò Bhéal Poetry Film Festival (2016, 2018), and at numerous poetry-film festivals around the world.
 



Vertigo (1:19)

Poem: Vertigo

by Charles Olsen

Synopsis – ‘Searching for balance in our hectic lives.’

Director: Charles Olsen (Spain)

Charles Olsen is a New Zealand artist and poet based in Madrid, Spain, since 2003. He was awarded the III Antonio Machado SxS Fellowship in 2018 and in 2017 he received the XIII distinction Poetas de Otros Mundos for the high quality of his poetic oeuvre from the Fondo Poético Internacional, Spain. His poetry films have been shown at international poetry film festivals and featured online in Moving Poems, Atticus Review, Blackmail Press and Poetry Film Live. With Lilián Pallares he directs the audiovisual production company antenblue ‘the observed word’ making films in the literary field. For more about Charles visit charlesolsen.es.



Virginia gave me Roses (2:05)

Poem: Virginia gave me Roses

by Lani O’Hanlon

Synopsis – A Poetry-Film exploring impermanence, female relationships and the rituals that sustain us in times of sorrow, loss and joy.

Director: Fiona Aryan (Ireland)

Fiona Aryan is an artist and filmmaker who likes to look at the beauty and magic that can be found in everyday life. ‘Going to the Well’, a poetry-film made with poet Lani O’Hanlon was shortlisted for the Ó Bhéal Poetry-Film competition in 2018. She is currently studying for a degree in film and TV production.


 



Blink (3:17)

Poem: Blink

by Jeff Thomson

Synopsis – Condemned to the guillotine, Antoine Lavoisier told his assistant that, as a final experiment, he would blink as many times as he could once his head had left his body.

Director: Amy Neswald (USA)

Amy Neswald is a writer and filmmaker. She currently teaches screenwriting at the University of Maine in Farmington. Her fiction has been published in The Rumpus, Green Mountain Review, and The Normal School and her films have received festival play in the U.S. and abroad.



Cathedral (2:36)

Poem: Cathedral

by Dave Richardson

Synopsis – My brother lost his virginity behind the barn, he says, but he says a lot of things… sometimes we want to hold on to sanctuaries and cathedrals even as they crumble.

Director: Dave Richardson (USA)

Dave Richardson is an Associate Professor of Graphic Design at Eastern Illinois University, in Charleston, Illinois, USA, where he teaches interactive and motion design in the Art and Design Department. His MFA is from Indiana University, Bloomington, and his print and motion design work have been exhibited in solo and group shows across the United States and internationally.
 



Handala’s Dream (6:06)

Poem: Handala’s Dream

by Lina Abojaradeh and Anas Mourad

Synopsis – An Arabic/English video that tells the story of how the Palestinian diaspora came to be and how the art of the greats like Ghassan Kanafani, Mahmoud Darwish and Naji Al-Ali have a huge role in keeping hope for peace and freedom alive.

Director: Lina Abojaradeh (Jordan / Palestine)

Lina Abojaradeh is an Architecture graduate who identifies as an artist and activist. She is a graduate of multiple international fellowships for civic and youth leaders. As founder of the volunteer initiative Archismile, she hopes to use art as a way to engage others, by creating murals with powerful messages in undeserved parts of her community. She is also the winner of multiple international awards in filmmaking, writing and art, including the Plural + Film Award and the ‘I am a Migrant’ (IAAM) campaign. She aims to use her skills in writing poetry, art, and video making to spread the positive messages she passionately believes in, especially revolving around her home country, Palestine. She has exhibited her work and spoken about her mission in countries including Ireland, Argentina,Turkey, US, Tunisia and Egypt.



Little Johnny (2:12)

Poem: Little Johnny

by Jordan Murshed

Synopsis – ‘Little Johnny’ is a short spoken word film created to highlight the issue of Mental Health. The film looks specifically at Ireland and Irish Youth with a clear message that Mental Health is something that we should be talking about.

Director: Edvinas Maciulevicius (Ireland)

Born in Lithuania and having lived in Cork for most of his life Edvinas Maciulevicius turned a bootstrap crowdfunded film into a documentary feature; ‘My Other Life’ for a national broadcaster (RTÉ). Now based in LA Edvinas collaborates with big brands to make ‘mini-docs’ about Fitness & Wellbeing, Culture and Travel.




Competition Shortlist – Screening B (53:50)

Sunday 13th October @ 5.30pm

Dali, Carey’s Lane, Cork




Semi-Automatic Pantoum (5:34)

Poem: Semi-Automatic Pantoum

by Poetic Justice League, Chicago IL

Synopsis – An anti-gun violence poetry-film. “There are bullets in this poem. So best if you stay home.”
 

Director: Matt Mullins (USA)

Matt Mullins writes screenplays, fiction, and poetry, and makes poetry-films and digital/interactive literature. His films have been screened at numerous conferences and film festivals around the world including the Zebra Poetry Film Festival (Germany), Video Bardo (Brazil), Visible Verse (Canada), Liberated Words (England), Co-Kisser (USA), Rabbit Heart (USA), and The Body Electric (USA). His fiction and poetry have appeared in a number of print and online literary journals such as Mid American Review, Pleiades, Hunger Mountain, Descant, and Hobart. His debut collection of short stories, Three Ways of the Saw, was published by Atticus Books and was named a finalist for Foreword Reviews Book of the Year. His experimental, interactive/digital literary interfaces can be found at lit-digital.com.
 



We Are The Device (3:06)

Poem: We Are The Device

by Mark Niehus

Synopsis – We Are The Device is a Poetry Film which offers an impressionistic glimpse into a future where shifting privacy standards have gone unchecked to the point that it undermines one’s principles of privacy. The hope is that the film may prompt reflection on the rising concerns about privacy in the digital world. The device has become omnipresent, unseen, every aspect of our protagonist is being monitored to the point where even his walk becomes an algorithm. It is a dark perspective hung on a menacing soundscape.

Director: Mark Niehus (Australia)

Australian Poet and Artist Mark Niehus combines his poetry with digital art, video and music to create outcomes that capture and expand the mood, rhythms and meaning of his writing. Always seeking to discover new ways to apply his experimental ethos to engage audiences and push the boundaries of his art, Mark’s work illuminates and transforms urban environments and internal spaces into captivating visual canvases and poetic soundscapes. Mark’s films have been shown on television and at Festivals and around the world including, DELETE TV, Juteback Poetry Film Festival, All Together Now Art & Film Festival, Reelpoetry Film Festival, Newlyn International Film Festival and The Lift-off Sessions.
 




Song of the Nobird (3:16)

Poem: Song of the Nobird

by Rosemary Norman

Synopsis – Nobirds are the “no birds” that sing in Keats’s “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”. The poem is re-imagined as a computer game where the “knight at arms” and the “belle dame” might win one another if they make the right choices. Real birds as negative images haunt their quest.

Director: Stuart Pound (UK)

Stuart Pound lives in London and has worked in film, digital video, sound and the visual arts since the early 1970’s. Since 1995 he has collaborated with the poet Rosemary Norman. Video work has been screened regularly in London and at international festivals. Screenings include: BFI London Film Festival EXPERIMENTA 2017, Holland Animation Film Festival (Utrecht) 2017. Ottawa International Animation Festival 2017, Festival international du film d’animation, Annecy, 2017
 



Mr Sky (3:48)

Poem: Mr Sky

by Sarah Tremlett and Lucy English

Synopsis – From dawn to nightfall, the sky reflects a couple’s relationship (don’t forget to look for the face in the clouds).
 

Director: Sarah Tremlett (UK)

Poetry filmmaker, artist, writer and researcher Sarah Tremlett, MPhil, FRSA, SWIP, is co-director of Liberated Words Poetry Film festival and workshops. Known as a visual philosopher, for her research project on Contemplative Text and Audio-Visual Rhythms Project, and Matternal philosophy (Springer, 2009) she has received commissions (e.g. from Filmpoem in conjunction with the Poetry Society) and given talks on poetry film worldwide, judging at: Newlyn Film Festival, Light Up Poole and Liberated Words.

Screenings include: Zebra, Berlin; Athens Video Poetry Festival; Rabbit Heart, USA; The Poetry Society and presentations including: VideoBardo, Buenos Aires; Tarp, National Gallery of Art, Vilnius; The South Bank Centre, and Encounters Film Festival. Author and editor of The Poetics of Poetry Film, commissioned by Intellect Books, she has directed three films for The Book of Hours (Lucy English) and is creating several collections including: the continuing contemplative poetics series; a series on Time and Light and her ancestral geopoetic, research-based poetry film haibun novel Tree. She recently curated Uprooted – a touring screening about migration and the refugee crisis.
 

For more visit: sarahtremlett.com and liberatedwords.com



Misery (2:38)

Poem: Misery

by Sarah Sloat and Marie Craven

Synopsis – Misery is from visual poetry by Sarah Sloat. Her poetry art is created by using various techniques to ‘erase’ most of the words from pages of books, leaving only scattered words to form small poems. To these, she adds ‛found’ images, related to her little poems in associative ways that might recall surrealism. The words and images in this video are from Sarah’s collection of erased poems ‛found’ in Stephen King’s novel, Misery. A single poem, like a fragmented narrative, is further ‛found’ in Sarah’s ‛erasures’, via juxtapositions and video treatments of the selected visual poetry pieces.

Director: Marie Craven (Australia)

Marie Craven is a film-maker in Queensland, Australia, who has been making shorts for 35 years. Her work has exhibited extensively at international festivals and events, and gathered several awards. She has released over 60 video poems in the past five years, often made in net-collaboration with poets and other artists around the world. Over the decades, she has freelanced as a teacher of screen-writing at universities, technical colleges and community centres, a reviewer of films and books, an arts administrator, and a curator of film exhibitions, most notably the Australian National Focus at the 1994 Festival de Cine Experimental de Madrid. A major project in 2019-2020 is curating and managing a touring program of international video poems, titled ‛Poetry + Video’. Her first experience of film-making was in the mid-1980s, in the underground film community in Melbourne.
 



letter – to anyone who is listening (1:18)

Poem: letter – to anyone who is listening

by Doyali Islam

Synopsis – How does one inhabit a world in which “the moon / & the drone hang in the same sky”? Doyali Islam’s poem ‘letter’ interrogates this question, offering no solutions. The work is saturated with longing – and charged by it. The poem is one of Doyali Islam’s ‘split sonnets’ in which she creates a visual split of 7/7 lines on the page. The ‘split’ enacts the various psychic traumas, tensions, and ambivalences that we, as humans, carry and the film attempts to reflect this.

Director: Jane Glennie (UK)

Jane Glennie’s work has screened internationally, including: Digital Graffiti (Florida); PoetryFilm (UK/Iceland); Juteback (Colorado), Cadence (Seattle, WA); Athens Festival (Greece), Poetry + Video (Australia). She was a prizewinner in the Oxford Brookes Poetry Film competition (UK), has been awarded a Jury Special Mention at Weimar Poetry Film Festival (Germany); was a finalist for Best Production One Minute or Under at Rabbit Heart Poetry Film Festival (USA); and a finalist at Poole Poetry Film Competition (UK). Collaborations include: Lucy English for The Book of Hours; and Visible Poetry Project (New York 2018 & 2019). She was a speaker on the poetry film panel at MIX Conference 2019: Experiential Storytelling (Bath Spa University, UK).
 



Moss (4:02)

Poem: Moss

by Natalie Whittaker

Synopsis – The film is an interpretation of Natalie Whittaker’s poem ‘Moss’. I wanted to make a film version of this beautiful poem with imagery that complemented rather than simply repeated the words in a literal way. I used a series of my abstract photographs, which I’d subsequently animated, to create a sense of a drenched, creeping otherworld – ‘moss world’ if you like; the constantly shifting, morphing, spore-emitting world we carry inside us.

Director: Janet Lees (Isle of Man)

Janet Lees is an artist, poet and poetry filmmaker working primarily with photography, film and collage. Her film-based works have been selected for a wide range of festivals and prizes, including the International Videopoetry Festival and the Aesthetica Art Prize. Her poetry is widely published around the world and has won prizes in many different competitions. Last year she was the visual artist representing the Isle of Man at the Festival Interceltique in Lorient, France, with an exhibition of art photography, poems and poetry films. Her book House of Water, which combines her poetry and art photography, was published by Lily Publications in May 2019.
 



Am I A Monster (3:25)

Poem: Am I A Monster

by Aasia Majeed
 

Synopsis – Life should be a journey of self discovery. For some; it is a nightmare, enveloped by persecution and branded by the question…….Am I a Monster ?

Director: Paul Broderick (USA)

Paul Broderick has been making poetry films and short films for over five years. With a performing Arts background and a penchant for the Noir, Paul brings a unique interpretation to his films. Paul is an award-winning film maker. His films have been screened in numerous festivals around the world. Through his collaborative and often unexpected vision Paul describes his maxim; “The medium of film has no boundaries….There is no right or wrong, just expression”.
 



Connemara Illuminated (1:51)

Poem: Connemara Illuminated

by Christine Valters Paintner

Synopsis – An old poet trying to find inspiration suddenly comes across a shining orb in the middle of the tall Connemara grass.

Director: Luke Morgan (Ireland)

Luke Morgan is an Irish director and writer. His short films have screened at a variety of festivals, including the Galway Film Fleadh (2015, 2018), The Cork Film Festival (2016, 2018), Richard Harris International Film Festival (2014, 2016 & 2018), the Polish International Film Festival (2016) and the Short Film Corner at Cannes Film Festival (both 2015 and 2016). His debut feature-length film, “Sooner or Later”, premiered at the Galway Film Fleadh and Cork Film Festival last year to sell-out audiences, and is currently available to view on Amazon Prime in all of its 68 English-Speaking territories.
 



Fecund (1:14)

Poem: Fecund

by Kathy Gee

Synopsis – Observing the lush fecundity of her local woodland, the poet contemplates her own responses to childlessness. Filmed and written in Worcestershire, UK. Created with Filmora 9.

Director: Kathy Gee (UK)

Kathy Gee’s career was in heritage. Her poetry collection, Book of Bones, was published by V.Press in 2016 and she wrote the spoken word elements for suiteforthefallensoldier.com. Her small collection of duologues – Checkout, set in a corner shop – was published by V.Press in March 2019. Kathy started producing poetry film in January 2019 when she joined the Worcester Poetry Film Collective.
 



The Beach Woman (2:56)

Poem: The Beach Woman

by Alana Daly Mulligan

Synopsis – A piece about coming to terms with growing up and growing apart from family.
 

Director: Alana Daly Mulligan (Ireland)

Alana Daly Mulligan is an award-winning spoken-word “artivist” and filmmaker from Waterford, Ireland. Alana’s work targets heartstrings; battling brutal realities with the desire to connect, feel and love as a human being before everything else. She is the co-founder of the open mic Modwords-Cork and The Lit Young Writers Festival. Alana features in the acclaimed collection of prose and poetry Autonomy, Solstice Sounds Volume VI, The Quarryman V and has been published in the University Express and BND.

She has performed internationally at events like All Together Now, The First Fortnight Festival Cúirt International Poetry Festival (winning the opportunity to perform at Electric Picnic 2019) the Three-Dot-Dash-Summit in New York City and act as a support act to Shane Koyczan. Her spoken-word films are internationally recognised, having garnered over 80K views across social media. Alana is a Quercus Active Citizenship Scholar studying English and History in University College Cork.
 



Ithaka (4:26)

Poem: Ithaka

by Constantine P. Kavafy

Synopsis – “Ithaka” is one among Constantine P.Kavafy’s most important works which was inspired by the Homeric return journey of Odysseus to his home island. The theme of the poem is the happiness found in one’s journey of life and how the maturity of the soul increases over a period of time, still the journey continues and that is all a traveler could ask for.

Director: Kyriakos Chatzimichailidis (Greece)

Kyriakos Chatzimichailidis was born in 1963 in Thessaloniki. He studied paramedical professions and Cinema, Theater & Photography. Since 1985 he has been working in cinema through most roles involved in filmmaking. In recent years he has been working as a director and short film producer. He has worked for many short films and has produced more than fifty. His productions and the films he has directed have received more than 100 awards at Greek and international festivals.

In December 2000 he founded t-shOrt, a Non-profit Civic Company whose main object is the production and distribution of short films and additionally all short theatrical and artistic activities. He lives and creates in Athens whilst he gives seminars about screenplay – direction – teaching of actors and production of cinema. You can see more information at the site: t-short.gr/Kyr
 



I Don’t Feel Safe Inside my Skin (2:57)

Poem: Pantoum for Paris 2012

by Aoife Riach

Synopsis – A piece of film that seeks to convey the sense of anxiety and fear for one’s personal safety that most women and many men experience when walking home alone, the selected video footage echoes sentiments from the poem about the isolation of living in a large city and the culture of victim blaming. It uses music and video in tandem with the poem itself.

Director: Sarah Kelly (Ireland)

Sarah Kelly is a third year fine art student in Crawford College of Art and Design. She is originally from Kilkenny and currently studying in Cork. Her work often deals with images of fragility and ethereality, working with natural plant matter, painting sculpture and video.
 



LOST (3:09)

Poem: LOST

by Caroline Reid

Synopsis – A playful fusion of poetry, visual art and film in which a middle aged poet discovers that life’s interruptions to writing poetry are the very substance from which poems emerge.

Director: Pamela Boutros (Australia)

Living in Adelaide, South Australia Pamela Boutros graduated from UniSA with a Bachelor of Media Arts. She is a photographer by trade and works across the lenses to tell powerful stories of human experiences. Pamela specializes in capturing the energy and craft of live performance in music, theatre and spoken word.
 



The Garden of the Earthly Delights (4:19)

Poem: Where is the key?

by Isabel Chiara

 

Synopsis – Adaptation of The Garden of the Earthly Delights by Hieronymus Bosch.

Directors: Juan Ibánez (Spain)

Juan Ibáñez has been directing short films for nine years. He has 35 years of experience as a visual and digital artist and is qualified in Fine Arts, with a 2017 Master in Direction of Audiovisual Fiction. For More visit: juanibanez.wordpress.com/about/ and www.zippyframes.com Poet Isabel Chiara also co-produced the film.
 



Home (2:16)

Poem: Home

by Erin Fornoff

Synopsis – Shot over 6000km between Ireland and USA, over 4 airports, and across two continents, ‘Home,’ a poetry film featuring work by Erin Fornoff (featured) contrasts the pull and push of a life split between two countries, and the long slog to connect them.

Director: Dave Knox (Ireland)

David Knox runs Noname Video and has over 10 years experience in creating video and multimedia including documentary, music videos (for Lankum and Shrug Life, among many others) artistic film, and social media. His work has received multiple millions of views across a variety of social platforms including the Irish Times and The Guardian. He has been broadcast on numerous TV stations worldwide from Ireland to Indonesia and has also appeared in film festivals both nationally and internationally. With PushPull Collective he has created the renowned film Zozimus, chronicling the last days of Dolymount Stadium, and various features on direct provision, repeal the 8th, and the housing crisis in Ireland.
 



Dali, Carey’s Lane, Cork (Dali used to be the Pav)